Top 5 Most Impressive Vertical Gardens of the World

In an era where major cities are becoming increasingly packed with residential and commercial development in an effort to accommodate a rapidly increasingly population, innovation and creativity is more necessary than ever to introduce greenery in limited space. An ever popular application for introducing greenery into urban environments is the vertical garden.

Benefits

The benefits of vertical garden greenery include cleaner air, greater happiness and more beautiful urban landscapes. Research suggests that due to our longing for nature, the ability to enjoy natural beauty in an urban environment can increase productivity, lower mental distress and aid residents in achieving higher success in exercise activity.

Top 5 Impressive Vertical Gardens

There are some great examples of innovative vertical gardens developed to introduce natural beauty in limited space. We have listed 5 of our favourite examples of impressive and innovative vertical gardens around the world.

Tree House (Singapore)

Tree House (Singapore)

A 24-storey skyscraper in Singapore’s district 23 is home to 2,289 square metres of vertical garden. This development also features heat reducing windows and has been classified as the largest vertical garden in the world. This vertical garden was designed to reduce the district’s carbon footprint and is expected to reduce energy spend by 15-30%. (Source: Inhabitat)

Central Park (Sydney)

Central Park (Sydney)

Comprised of 120,000 native Australian plants and spread over 1,200 square metres, the Central Park building vertical garden in Sydney, Australia was designed to be a beautiful addition to the city and park below. (Source: The Urban Developer)

Rubens Hotel (London)

Rubens Hotel (London)

In the middle of the bustling London streetscape is 350 square metre vertical garden that sits proudly on the Rubens Hotel building. The purpose of this design was both a self-watering aesthetic addition to the city and an air-cleaning and flood mitigation initiative. (Source: Rubens Hotel)

The Currents (Quebec)

The Currents (Quebec)

The vertical garden on the interior of The Currents building in Quebec covers 200 square metres over 15 storeys and is entirely hydroponic, filtering the air for the entire skyscraper. The garden took 5 months to build and is classified as the largest indoor vertical garden in the world. The panelling system the garden is mounted on is also comprised of recycled materials. (Source: Inhabitat)

CaixaForum (Madrid)

CaixaForum (Madrid)

CaixaForum is an 1899 power station refurbished and turned into an art gallery with a 600 square metre vertical garden art installation designed by Patrick Blanc. This piece is comprised of 15,000 hearty, heat and cold resistant plants and is open for the public to touch and feel in the heart of Madrid’s cultural district. (Source: Greenroofs)

Jermaine

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