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Repurposed cargotecture dwellings keep naturally cool in Costa Rica

An environmentally conscious family tapped DAO and Re Arquitectura to design a home expansion project with a low environmental footprint. In response, the architecture firms created the Franceschi Container Houses, a series of cargotecture apartments to independently house the family’s three sons. Located in Santa Ana west of Costa Rica’s capital, the repurposed shipping container dwellings make use of passive climate control, solar water heaters, and recycled materials to minimize waste and energy demands.

 

Franceschi Container Houses by DAO and Re Arquitectura, Franceschi Container Houses Costa Rica, Franceschi Container Houses Santa Ana, repurposed shipping container housing, cargotecture in Costa Rica, cargotecture family home, cargotecture apartments,

Franceschi Container Houses by DAO and Re Arquitectura, Franceschi Container Houses Costa Rica, Franceschi Container Houses Santa Ana, repurposed shipping container housing, cargotecture in Costa Rica, cargotecture family home, cargotecture apartments,

Set next to the Uruca River canyon, the Franceschi Container Houses were built on the same property as the main family house where the clients have been living for around 20 years. The project comprises three independent units raised off the ground for minimal landscape impact. The dwellings were built from repurposed 40-foot-tall cargo containers and feature identical floor plans.

Franceschi Container Houses by DAO and Re Arquitectura, Franceschi Container Houses Costa Rica, Franceschi Container Houses Santa Ana, repurposed shipping container housing, cargotecture in Costa Rica, cargotecture family home, cargotecture apartments,

Franceschi Container Houses by DAO and Re Arquitectura, Franceschi Container Houses Costa Rica, Franceschi Container Houses Santa Ana, repurposed shipping container housing, cargotecture in Costa Rica, cargotecture family home, cargotecture apartments,

Related: Qatar unveils first-ever FIFA World Cup stadium to be built from shipping containers

The architects carefully placed the dwellings to maximize passive climate control conditions and to optimize natural lighting. The social areas and a deep covered porch are located on the ground floor while the private areas are placed on the upper level. Waste was minimized through recycling and leftover materials like wood and metal were reused for miscellaneous objects like handrails, door handles, planters, and hangers.

+ Re Arquitectura

Via ArchDaily

Images via Re Arquitectura

Franceschi Container Houses by DAO and Re Arquitectura, Franceschi Container Houses Costa Rica, Franceschi Container Houses Santa Ana, repurposed shipping container housing, cargotecture in Costa Rica, cargotecture family home, cargotecture apartments,

Franceschi Container Houses by DAO and Re Arquitectura, Franceschi Container Houses Costa Rica, Franceschi Container Houses Santa Ana, repurposed shipping container housing, cargotecture in Costa Rica, cargotecture family home, cargotecture apartments,

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Containers of Hope: Cool Costa Rican Shipping Container House Only Costs $40,000

 
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Containers of Hope, Benjamin Garcia Saxe, shipping containers, cargotecture, low cost housing, affordable housing, costa rica

You might remember Saxe as the architect who built his mother this gorgeous bamboo retreat with a moon skylight. Although based in London, Saxe spends a lot of time in Central America and he helped design this spectacularly simple, yet luxurious container home for their property outside of San Jose. Gabriela Calvo and Marco Peralta wanted to live on their property, spend time with their horses and enjoy the natural landscape, but not go into debt building the home of their dreams. By utilizing recycled shipping containers and doing some of the work themselves, they were able to keep the ultimate cost of the home down to $40,000, which is inexpensive for many parts of the world.

Two 40′ containers were trucked in and installed on pier foundations slightly set apart to create a wider cross section. The containers were pulled apart to create larger window sections and great views of both the east and the west. Large holes were cut from the sides to install glass and aluminum framed windows. Scraps taken from the sides of the container were used as roofing on the raised center and the walls were insulated with industrial grade insulation. New wood floors were installed over the containers and the newly created middle section. The raised center provides natural daylighting and a wind tower effect encouraging natural ventilation, which works so well that they never have to turn on their AC.

As Saxe wrote to us, “I believe that the power of design comes from inspiring others with our work to look at alternate and creative  solutions for dwellings in order to provide and gift them with a greater financial freedom.” The project is already gaining attention for its use of recycled materials, simple, yet clear and efficient design as well as its affordability.

+ Benjamin Garcia Saxe

Images ©Benjamin Garcia Saxe

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